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FEELING CHALLENGED?

Work with a Calgary psychologist who knows how to overcome challenges… Depression, anxiety, stress & other psychological issues may seem as daunting as completing a marathon. My approach to “Plan, Take Action & Track Progress”, has helped 100s of clients. I used this approach to attain a black belt in karate and to succeed in the Boston Marathon and Ironman.

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Dr. Patrick Keelan, Psychologist

Counselling Offices in Calgary and Cochrane

Calgary Psychologist Experienced with Media Interviews and Speaking Engagements

Media & Speaking Engagements

Available and experienced with television, radio, newspaper and magazine interviews.

In the News & On Stage

See Topics of Discussion and Past Interviews and Events.
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Free Initial Consultation with Calgary Psychologist Dr. Patrick Keelan

Free Initial Consultation

I offer a no charge initial 30 minute consultation in Calgary or Cochrane to provide you us with an opportunity to meet and discuss your needs and ensure your comfort.

Take the First Step

Meet with Dr. Pat for a FREE Initial 30-Minute Consultation
Book FREE Consult
Calgary Psychologist to Help You Achieve Difficult Goals

Formula for Success

My approach to “Plan, Take Action & Track Progress”, has helped 100s of clients succeed.

About Dr. Pat

Work with a psychologist with a record of achieving difficult results.
About Dr. Pat

Latest Articles From Dr. Pat’s Psychology Blog

What to do if you’ve decided that therapy doesn’t work for you?

In this article, I discuss how to proceed when you’ve determined that therapy doesn’t work for you. In my work as a Calgary psychologist and a Cochrane psychologist, I often get clients or prospective clients who are reluctant to proceed with therapy, a particular form of therapy or a specific therapy technique because they have determined either that ‘it doesn’t work’ or ‘it doesn’t work for me’. Such beliefs about therapy, forms of therapy or therapy techniques not working at all or not working for the individual may be in many instances inaccurate. More importantly, these negative beliefs can interfere with the individual making progress in therapy going forward. In the following sections, I will discuss why these negative beliefs about therapy can interfere with progress and how to change them to beliefs which are more conducive to success...[more]

How to pick yourself up when you’ve ‘fallen down’

In this article, I discuss how to keep moving forward in the face of repeated adversity at the hands of others. One of my favourite movies is Falling Down from 1993 which stars Michael Douglas. It features a man having an extremely frustrating day in which he encounters one thing after another going wrong. His frustration is compounded by it being created primarily by people who appear to care only for themselves and who enjoy inflicting suffering on others. The film begins with Douglas’s character, referred to as ‘D-Fens’ in reference to the letters on his license plate, being let go from his job because he was ‘not economically viable’. On his drive home on a blistering hot day, he is stuck in the middle of noisy traffic because of construction work which does not seem to be serving any purpose. D-Fens abandons his car and encounters a series of frustrations to which he responds each time with a violent retaliation toward the source of his frustration. This includes taking a baseball bat to the...[more]

Improve your relationships by changing the way you think

In this article, I discuss how to improve your relationships by using skills from cognitive behavioural therapy. In my work as a Calgary psychologist and a Cochrane psychologist, I see a lot of couples who want help in improving their relationships. Much of the work involves applying skills from Dr. John Gottman’s Sound Relationship House model. These skills focus on two main parts of the ‘relationship house’—how well the couple manages conflict and how good a ‘relationship friendship’ they have. Skills to manage conflict entail learning how to communicate constructively about issues while friendship-building skills involve the couple spending time connecting with each other and nurturing each other’s preferred ‘love languages’. Couples who consistently apply Gottman’s skills to manage conflict and build friendship typically improve their relationships. Unfortunately, in many instances couples struggle in having the motivation to use the skills and stay consistent at them to the point that their relationships improve. A factor which plays a key role in this lack of motivation and inconsistency is negative thinking the partners have about each other and their relationship...[more]